What Types of Technology Are Used In the Classroom?

Today’s classrooms look vastly different than they did even just a couple of years ago. Mostly, this is because teachers are passionate about connecting with students and making learning come to life. To this end, effective teachers are innovators, always looking for new ways to enhance student learning and outcomes. In this blog, we’re going to take a look at the different types of classroom technology they’ve got their eyes on for the future.

What Types of Technology Are Used In the Classroom?

Today’s classrooms look vastly different than they did even just a couple of years ago. Mostly, this is because teachers are passionate about connecting with students and making learning come to life. To this end, effective teachers are innovators, always looking for new ways to enhance student learning and outcomes. In this blog, we’re going to take a look at the different types of classroom technology they’ve got their eyes on for the future.

 

Why Should Teachers Use Technology In the Classroom?

The benefits of using technology in the classroom are wide-ranging. Within the classroom context, how does technology improve student learning? When it’s well-selected and implemented, classroom technology can:

 

    • Engage students with active learning experiences. The integration of familiar devices like laptops and tablets enables more self-directed and interactive learning opportunities. When students can participate in discussions and engage with the material through tangible technology, they are not only more likely to participate but more likely to retain the material as well. 
    • Create individual, personalized learning opportunities. Since we know no one learns in the same way or at the same pace as others, technology provides meaningful lesson differentiation for individual needs. For example, several assistive technologies can provide helpful accommodations for students who might be struggling or have a  learning disability. 
    • Facilitate meaningful collaboration. Many teachers shy away from assigning group projects because students can find it difficult to coordinate their efforts and teachers struggle with how to fairly assess the outcomes. Technology provides more dynamic opportunities for students to communicate and share work digitally. Free collaborative platforms like Google Docs offer the ability for students to collaborate in real-time on shared documents. As an added bonus, the more tech-savvy students model technology use for students who are less experienced with it.
    • Prepares students for the future. Classroom technology doesn’t just serve the curriculum—it also extends it. A number of 21st-century skills directly relate to technology, including research skills, collaboration, critical thinking, global awareness, and digital literacy. The proliferation of online misinformation and “sponsored content” provides tech-savvy teachers with a unique opportunity to teach students about evaluating sources and their credibility as they perform research activities.

 

How Can Technology Help Teachers Redefine the Classroom Experience?

In addition to these benefits, some examples of technology in the classroom can also redefine the classroom experience itself. Popular among technology-infused classrooms as well as eLearning and remote learning environments, a learning management system (LMS) solves many challenges of traditional classroom learning. An LMS platform is a digital interface where teachers and students can communicate and collaborate; examples include Blackboard, Canvas, and Google Classroom.

 

A classroom teacher can leverage an LMS in a number of ways, primarily centering around creating, managing, and organizing lesson plans and ancillary materials. Students can access assignments and resources, track their progress, communicate with their teachers and peers, submit completed projects, and more. Using an LMS helps to create parity between the traditional classroom experience and remote or blended learning models—among other things, this helps absent students to keep up with their work (or at least know what they’re missing).

 

Implementation Considerations

Technology alone isn’t a magic bullet for educators or students. More important than what technology teachers use is how teachers use technology in the classroom. While adding a new type of technology to the classroom mix might provide short gains for its novelty, without adequate planning and preparation, the benefits will be limited. Here are a few tips for selecting and implementing the right tool or tools for your classroom:

 

  • Put student achievement and outcomes first. Implementing new technology without first thinking through what it’s meant to accomplish can be futile. Instead, teachers and administrators should identify—and prioritize—barriers to student success and then evaluate what tools might help teachers and their students overcome these barriers.
  • Don’t overlook the concept of equitable access. High-tech teaching tools are only as effective as they are equitable. This means thinking about things like internet accessibility. Suppose some students are only able to access learning materials when they are at school, while others have virtually unlimited access. In that case, it creates a situation where some students are better positioned to succeed than others.
  • Consider the future. Adopting an exciting new type of technology without thinking beyond the current school year is an unwise approach. Does the technology provide broad enough benefits that more than one classroom can leverage it—across grade levels as well as subjects? Is it easy for new teachers to learn and adapt without significant disruption to teacher training? 

 

XR Technologies: Rethinking the Math Department

As mentioned before, the best type of classroom technology empowers teachers to overcome barriers and enhance student learning outcomes. At XR Technologies, we know of several problems impacting math departments across the country, including teacher shortages, teachers not receiving enough support, and ineffective/inconsistent use of classroom technology. These problems all lead to one truly problematic outcome: students are falling behind.

 

Math Department as a Service

We help schools to solve their teacher shortage and teacher support problems by offering Math Department as a Service. This innovative solution provides schools with the opportunity to essentially outsource their math department. This includes a combination of in-person and virtual learning, with an adaptive curriculum that leverages technology to create an equitable and engaging learning environment for students.

 

Learn more about how our innovative solution can support—and transform—secondary math education. 

Leave a Comment